What does the idiom "beat sb black and blue" mean?

Although the meanings of the words in them do not make any sense when examined one by one, the word groups that are shaped according to the cultural roots of the language and that make sense as a whole are called idioms. beat sb black and blue meaning, in what situations is it used?

Meaning of "beat sb black and blue"

Meaning

The phrase “beat someone black and blue” is used to refer to a form of physical violence that results in severe bruising or injury. It is generally used to describe a situation in which someone has been brutally beaten, punched, or kicked. This phrase is often used in reference to a situation where the perpetrator has not used any weapons, but instead has relied solely on their own physical strength to inflict the damage.

Etymology

The phrase “beat someone black and blue” is believed to have originated in the early 1800s. It is thought that the phrase may have stemmed out of the idea that someone’s skin color can change after they have been subjected to a significant amount of physical force. The phrase is also likely to have been used in reference to the color of someone’s skin after they have been subjected to physical abuse or trauma.

Usage

The phrase “beat someone black and blue” is typically used in informal contexts to refer to a form of physical violence that results in severe bruising or injury. It is most commonly used in reference to a situation in which someone has been subjected to a beating that could not have been achieved without a significant amount of physical force. The phrase is rarely used in a positive manner, as it usually implies that some form of physical violence has occurred.

Example Sentences

  • The bullies in the neighborhood are often beating other kids black and blue, so you should be careful if you’re ever in the area.
  • The assailant beat his victim black and blue, leaving him with multiple bruises and broken bones.
  • The angry mob beat the thief black and blue for stealing from the store.

The meanings of the words in the "beat sb black and blue" idiom

Idioms with similar meaning

"Don't judge a book by its cover" is an English idiom that means you shouldn't make assumptions about someone or something based solely on its appearance. In Japanese, the similar idiom is "Hana yori dango," which translates to "Dumplings rather than flowers." This idiom means that substance is more important than appearance.

NO COMMENT

No comment has been written about beat sb black and blue yet, you can write the first comment and share your thoughts with our other visitors.
Leave a Reply