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Correct spelling for full

Have you ever wondered about the correct spelling and meaning of the word full? Do you want to know how to pronounce full? Our page has got you covered! Discover the correct spelling, definition, and etymology of this word, as well as sample sentences, idioms, and proverbs featuring full.

This word consists of 4 letters and is spelled as "F-U-L-L". It has 1 vowel and 3 consonants.

How do you spell full

Typo fix for "full"

full

adjective
How to pronunciation full: ˈfu̇l

What does Full Mean?

What does full meaning in English

  1. Containing all that is normal or possible: a full pail.
  2. Complete in every particular: a full account.
  3. Baseball a. Amounting to three balls and two strikes. Used of a count. b. Having a base runner at first, second, and third base: The bases were full when the slugger stepped up to bat. a. Amounting to three balls and two strikes. Used of a count. b. Having a base runner at first, second, and third base: The bases were full when the slugger stepped up to bat.
  4. . a. Of maximum or highest degree: at full speed. b. Being at the peak of development or maturity: in full bloom. c. Of or relating to a full moon. a. Of maximum or highest degree: at full speed. b. Being at the peak of development or maturity: in full bloom. c. Of or relating to a full moon.
  5. Having a great deal or many: a book full of errors.
  6. Totally qualified, accepted, or empowered: a full member of the club. 7. a. Rounded in shape; plump: a full figure. b. Having or made with a generous amount of fabric: full draperies. a. Rounded in shape; plump: a full figure. b. Having or made with a generous amount of fabric: full draperies. 8. a. Having an appetite completely satisfied, especially for food or drink: was full after the Thanksgiving dinner. b. Providing an abundance, especially of food. a. Having an appetite completely satisfied, especially for food or drink: was full after the Thanksgiving dinner. b. Providing an abundance, especially of food. 9. Having depth and body; rich: a full aroma; full tones. 10. Completely absorbed or preoccupied: “He was already pretty full of himself” (Ron Rosenbaum). 1
  7. Possessing both parents in common: full brothers; full sisters. 1
  8. Of or relating to a full-size bed: full sheets; a full bed skirt.

Other definitions for full

How to spell full

Want to know how to spell full, you will find a comprehensive answer on this topic. The word "full consists of 1 syllables and is spelled "ˈfu̇l".

Synonyms for full:

There are synonyms for full'. Depending on the situation and context, the following words are also often used instead of full:

brimful, brimming, bursting, chockablock, chock-full, crammed, crowded, fat, filled, jammed, jam-packed, loaded, packed, stuffed

Some words similar to "full"

Idioms with the word full

The word "full" in works of art

Every man, according to an ancient legend, is born into the world with two bags suspended from his neck - a small bag in front full of his neighbors' faults, and a large bag behind filled with his own faults. Hence it is that men are quick to see the faults of others, and yet are often blind to their own failings.

The Queen of Spades / Alexander Pushkin

Life's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and is heard no more. It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.

Macbeth / William Shakespeare

What is full in other languages

  • full in French:
  • full in German:
  • full in Spanish:
  • full in Italian:
  • full in Russian:
  • full in Hindi:
  • full in Turkish:
  • full in Japanese:

How many points in scrabble for full

How many points is the word "full" in Scrabble? Is "full" a Scrabble word? Here is the letter-by-letter scoring of the Scrabble game, which is played all over the world in different languages and with different words.

  • F
    4
  • U
    1
  • L
    1
  • L
    1
The total scrabble score for the word full is 7

The Role of Themes in Literature

The Role of Themes in Literature  Themes are the central ideas or messages that an author is trying to convey through a literary work. They can explore universal human experiences, societal issues, or philosophical concepts, and they can add depth and meaning to a story beyond its surface-level plot. For example, in George Orwell's "1984," the themes of totalitarianism, surveillance, and the abuse of power reflect the author's concerns about the dangers of authoritarian governments. Similarly, the themes of love, loss, and redemption in Khaled Hosseini's "The Kite Runner" explore the complex relationships between fathers and sons, as well as the impact of war and displacement on personal identity.

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