What does the idiom "in full flow" mean?

The phrase in full flow is often used in English, but what does this idiom mean? When idioms are used in the right situations, they strengthen communication and enrich the language. You can communicate more effectively by learning the meaning of in full flow.

Meaning of "in full flow"

Meaning

The idiom ‘in full flow’ is used to describe a situation of great momentum, energy, and enthusiasm that is considered continuous and unstoppable. It is typically used to refer to a particularly productive or effective state. It can also be applied to a long-running wave of conversations, debates, narratives, and ideas.

Etymology

The idiom ‘in full flow’ has developed from the longer phrase ‘in full swing or flow’, which dates back to the early nineteenth century. It is derived from the Old English word SWINGAN, which means to move in a curved or pendulum arc. The phrase was originally used to describe a moving body of water, such as a river in flood. By the late nineteenth century, the phrase had been extended to more figurative references.

Usage

The idiom ‘in full flow’ is used to describe a situation that is at its peak of productivity or effectiveness, and seen as unstoppable. It is a relatively informal phrase, and is often used in the context of creative or educational pursuits. This could include debates and conversations, where a group of people have been discussing a topic for an extended period of time, and are providing stimulating, insightful, and productive conversation.

Example Sentences

  • The debate was in full flow and no one wanted to be the first to leave.
  • She was in full flow and nothing could stop her.
  • The conversation had been in full flow for hours.

The meanings of the words in the "in full flow" idiom

The universal role of idioms

"Kill two birds with one stone" is an English idiom that means to accomplish two things with a single action. In French, the similar idiom is "Faire d'une pierre deux coups," which translates to "To kill two birds with one stone." This idiom highlights the efficiency of completing two tasks with one action.

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