What does the idiom "It is always darkest before the dawn" mean?

Are you using the idiom It is always darkest before the dawn but not sure about its meaning? Using idioms, which are important elements of spoken and written language, in the right place strengthens your language skills. Examine the meaning of the It is always darkest before the dawn idiom and the situations in which it is used.

Meaning of "It is always darkest before the dawn"

Meaning

The phrase “It is always darkest before the dawn” is an idiom that means that in difficult situations, hope is always just around the corner. Even when things seem their worst, they will eventually get better. This idiom can be used to encourage someone struggling with a difficult situation, as a reminder that eventually, things will get better.

Etymology

This idiom dates back to the 1700s, when it was first used in a text written by poet Thomas Fuller. He wrote “It is always darkest just before the day dawneth” in his book Gnomologia: Adagies and Proverbs, Wise Sentences and Witty Sayings Ancient and Modern, Foreign and British. The phrase was likely inspired by the idea of dawn being the darkest part of the night before the sun rises, and was then used as a metaphor for finding hope in difficult situations.

Usage

This idiom can be used in a variety of different situations. It is a reminder that every situation has its ups and downs and that challenging times can eventually give way to positive change. It can be used to encourage and inspire someone dealing with a difficult situation, as an assurance that things will eventually get better.

Example Sentences

  • “I know this is hard right now, but it’s always darkest before the dawn. Things will get better.”
  • “Don’t lose hope. You’re in the darkest part of the night, but the dawn is coming.”
  • “Remember that it is always darkest before the dawn. You may feel like giving up, but things will get better.”
  • “No matter how hard things seem, it’s important to remember that the dawn will come, and you will get through this.”

The meanings of the words in the "It is always darkest before the dawn" idiom

From Shakespeare to Social Media: The Evolution of English Idioms

English idioms have been around for centuries, with many originating from sources like literature, mythology, and everyday life. Shakespeare, for example, coined many phrases that are still used today, such as "break the ice" and "heart of gold." Over time, new idioms have emerged, with social media and popular culture providing rich sources of inspiration. For instance, the phrase "throwing shade" came into use in the 1990s thanks to ball culture, but has since been popularized by social media.

NO COMMENT

No comment has been written about It is always darkest before the dawn yet, you can write the first comment and share your thoughts with our other visitors.
Leave a Reply