What does the idiom "not all it\'s cracked up to be" mean?

Although the meanings of the words in them do not make any sense when examined one by one, the word groups that are shaped according to the cultural roots of the language and that make sense as a whole are called idioms. not all it\'s cracked up to be meaning, in what situations is it used?

Meaning of "not all it\'s cracked up to be"

Meaning

The phrase “not all it’s cracked up to be” is an English language idiom that is used to describe something that is not as good as it appears to be. It is often used to indicate that the thing being discussed is not as great, impressive, or exciting as it originally appeared, and that there may be undesirable aspects or flaws to it.

Etymology

The phrase “not all it’s cracked up to be” first appeared in print in the early 20th century. Its origin is uncertain, but some etymologists believe it is related to the phrase “cracked up to be,” which was used in 19th-century America to mean “to be praised or upbraded.” The use of the phrase in the negative context of “not all it’s cracked up to be” likely comes from the idea that something is not as good as originally thought.

Usage

This phrase is typically used as an expression of disappointment or dissatisfaction towards something. It is often used to comment on the lack of quality or attention to detail in something that was expected to be of a higher quality. It can also be used to warn of the potential dangers of a situation that appear to be more advantageous than they are in reality. It is generally used as a conversational piece in casual settings.

Example Sentences

  • “This house is not all it’s cracked up to be. The walls are paper thin, and the plumbing is a mess.”
  • “That restaurant wasn’t all it’s cracked up to be. I was expecting five-star service, but it was more like two-star.”
  • “This job isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. The pay is low and the hours are long.”
  • “This mountain hike isn’t all it’s cracked up to be. It’s exhausting and the view isn’t worth it.”

The meanings of the words in the "not all it\'s cracked up to be" idiom

The universal role of idioms

"Kill two birds with one stone" is an English idiom that means to accomplish two things with a single action. In French, the similar idiom is "Faire d'une pierre deux coups," which translates to "To kill two birds with one stone." This idiom highlights the efficiency of completing two tasks with one action.

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