What does the idiom "on this/that account" mean?

The phrase on this/that account is often used in English, but what does this idiom mean? When idioms are used in the right situations, they strengthen communication and enrich the language. You can communicate more effectively by learning the meaning of on this/that account.

Meaning of "on this/that account"

Meaning

The phrase ‘on this/that account’ is an idiom which is used to refer to a reason for a certain course of action or opinion. It is used to refer to a particular thing that has been taken into account when making a decision or when forming an opinion. It is a common phrase which is used in spoken and written English.

Etymology

The origins of the phrase ‘on this/that account’ are unclear. It appears to have arisen as a variation of the phrase ‘in this/that account’ which is found in 16th century English texts. It is likely that this phrase was derived from the Latin term ‘hunc/illic’ which means ‘on this/that side’.

Usage

The phrase ‘on this/that account’ is often used in both spoken and written English. It can be used to refer to a particular point taken into account when making a decision or when forming an opinion. It is usually used when there are several factors that need to be considered when making a decision or forming an opinion.

For example, it can be used in the context of making a decision about a job offer. You might say: “I think I will accept the job offer, on this account.” This means that you have taken into account all the factors that made you decide to accept the job offer and this is the main factor that has weighed in your decision.

Example Sentences

  • I decided against renting the house, on that account.
  • I think I will go for the more expensive option, on this account.
  • I don't think I will attend the party, on this account.
  • I think I will choose this college, on this account.
  • I have decided to take the job, on that account.

The meanings of the words in the "on this/that account" idiom

The universal role of idioms

"Kill two birds with one stone" is an English idiom that means to accomplish two things with a single action. In French, the similar idiom is "Faire d'une pierre deux coups," which translates to "To kill two birds with one stone." This idiom highlights the efficiency of completing two tasks with one action.

NO COMMENT

No comment has been written about on this/that account yet, you can write the first comment and share your thoughts with our other visitors.
Leave a Reply