What does the idiom "until the cows come home" mean?

until the cows come home is an idiom used by many writers. When idioms are used in the right place, they open the doors of effective communication and increase your descriptive power. In this way, you will be better understood. The meaning of the expression until the cows come home is also remarkable in this respect.

Meaning of "until the cows come home"

Meaning

The phrase 'until the cows come home' is an idiomatic expression meaning a long or indefinite period of time. It is derived from an old English proverb, which states that “the cow will never come home until she has been milked three times” – this was a way of conveying the idea that a certain task would take a great deal of time.

Etymology

This phrase first appeared in print around 1831, in a volume of folklore entitled “Yorkshire Sayings”. It is thought that the phrase is derived from an old English proverb which states that “the cow will never come home until she has been milked three times”. This was a way of conveying the idea that a certain task would take a great deal of time, and so it is likely that the phrase itself has been in use since at least the early 18th Century.

Usage

The phrase is used to indicate that something will take a long time to complete or to describe a long, indefinite period of time. It is often used for humorous effect, as it is such a long time to wait for something! For example, someone might say “I could wait for you until the cows come home”, as a way of conveying that they are willing to wait for a very long time.

Example Sentences

  • I could wait for you until the cows come home.
  • I'm going to wait here until the cows come home.
  • He insisted he could do the job until the cows come home.

The meanings of the words in the "until the cows come home" idiom

From One Language to Another: Idioms in Translation

Translating idioms from one language to another can be a tricky task, as the cultural context behind an idiom can be difficult to capture. For example, the French phrase "avoir le cafard" translates to "to have the cockroach," which means to feel down or depressed. Similarly, the Chinese idiom "????" (j?ng d? zh? w?) translates to "frog at the bottom of a well," which refers to someone with a narrow view of the world.

NO COMMENT

No comment has been written about until the cows come home yet, you can write the first comment and share your thoughts with our other visitors.
Leave a Reply